Review: To Die but Once by Jacqueline Winspear. #14 in the Maisie Dobbs series.

To Die but Once (Maisie Dobbs, #14)To Die but Once by Jacqueline Winspear

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is #14 in the Maisie Dobbs series and one of the best. I did get a bit confused with all the names as so many characters from the previous books made their appearance in this volume. Nevertheless, this is an excellent story and the way is open for another book.

Jacqueline Winspear’s research means that every fact checks out. She speaks of her own family’s experiences in the Great War and the Second World War. She seamlessly segues this knowledge into the story and this, of course, enriches and supports the plot. I learned, again, about the Dunkirk evacuation. Many years ago I read The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico and I remember weeping as I turned the pages. Here, in Winspear’s book, the story of Dunkirk becomes so personal. I feel sure she also read The Snow Goose.

In Winspear’s To Die but Once I learned about the connection of Whitchurch in Hampshire, England, to the Bank of England during the war. I learned of the fake airfields set up to fool the Luftwaffe; all this and so much more.

I learned of the young trainee soldiers who didn’t survive their first parachute jump. Their bodies were collected from Salisbury Plain by the WAAF ambulances. I realise again and again the futility of war.

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Review: To Die but Once by Jacqueline Winspear. #14 in the Maisie Dobbs series.

Disappointing.

Normal PeopleNormal People by Sally Rooney

My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I’ve realised what the problem is with Sally Rooney and me. In a word, “Millennial”. So, with a hop, skip, and a jump I finished this book and moved on to something more substantial.

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Disappointing.

For the Most Beautiful by Emily Hauser

For the Most BeautifulFor the Most Beautiful by Emily Hauser

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really tried not to read this enchanting story too quickly.

As far back as I can remember I have been fascinated by the Greek myths; the stories, the heroes, the gods and goddesses. Thank you to my good friend Suzie Leaderbrand for recommending this book.

A more complete review will follow sometime soon.

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For the Most Beautiful by Emily Hauser

Review, such as it is, of the charming book, The 100 Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared

Jonas Jonasson's The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (Trivia-On-Books)Jonas Jonasson’s The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Such a quirky book from Jonas Jonasson. It puts me in mind of A Man Called Ove and I thoroughly enjoyed that. Something about Nordic authors – the books are either bleak and terrifying, such as The Keeper of Lost Causes or witty and charming like this one. That is not to say there isn’t violence and cruelty in the story, but there is an underlying joy of life. Maybe, because I am older, the age of the main character draws me in. It makes me realise that life goes on.

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Review, such as it is, of the charming book, The 100 Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared