Bali, Gunung Agung

This is last week’s blog. Somehow I didn’t get round to writing one then.

My love affair with Bali began in 2009. With several others, I joined my friend and colleague Michele Hendarwin on a Yoga Retreat and cultural experience. This turned out to be a life-changing time for me. I had never wished to visit Bali before but, in the interests of challenging my (then) fear of flying, Michele convinced me that the short flight from Perth to Bali (about three-and-a-half hours) was a good place to start! Since then I have returned to Bali once or twice a year. Sometimes with Michele’s Yoga Retreat and sometimes with my family.

 

At the moment the one thing on my mind is Gunung Agung volcano in Bali. I’m wondering if there is a tipping point after which the eruption has to take place? The volcano is presently rumbling and shaking and the seismic charts look dire.

The Indonesian authorities have already evacuated over 25,000 people from Karangasem district to centres such as the one in Klungkung where they are being cared for. The evacuees have had to leave their homes, temples, pets, and livestock. The crops in the fields lie in the direct path of the volcano.

The last time Gunung Agung erupted was in 1963 and lasted for a year. In that eruption, ash and lava was thrown 10kms into the air. Acid rain and rocks rained down on the east coast of the island. The official (conservative) estimate of people killed in that eruption is around 1,200. However, many of the elders who lived through it believe the number of people killed was in excess of 5,000.

Water, especially clean, potable water, is always an issue in Bali. The camps have limited resources for the many thousands of evacuees. ABC News reports: “At the Klungkung evacuation centre south of Mt Agung, soldiers from the Indonesian army were preparing rice for the 3,500 villagers who had moved into the site. The evacuees were housed in tents and the local sports hall, sleeping on camp beds and the floor.” In the midst of the trauma it warms my heart that care is being taken of those Balinese displaced by the impending eruption.

Gunung Agung is a mighty volcano, over 3,000m high. Pura Besakih is a temple complex in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung. It is the most important, the largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali. The monks have been evacuated from the temple.

Mt. Batur, also erupted in 1963, a few months after Agung. Mt Batur is known for the hot springs in the caldera. Kintamani is the village on the rim of the volcano.

To my all my Balinese friends, I wish you safe passage through this troubling time.

Amed village, East Bali, Indonesia
Bali’s highest volcano Mt Agung, seen from the black sand beach at Amed village in East Bali, Indonesia.

 

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Bali, Gunung Agung

Bali

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I think I caught the cold in Bali as the day before we left I said to Kath how stiff I was feeling – thinking it was from all the yoga. I self-medicated with gin and soda but that didn’t work! The plane trip back to Perth was fairly horrible but luckily not too many people and Perth airport was more or less deserted. Bali was quite cool most of the time. I think I must’ve been Balinese in a previous incarnation because I wore a jumper most of the time and the only other people who did were Balinese! There were heaps of Europeans wearing very little.

 

Some people are not keen on Bali but for me it is the best place. This last trip, a sneaky little five-day number, was lovely. I’m not a massage addict but managed to have two amazing sessions: one in Sanur at The Nest (highly recommended) and an extra long spa treatment in Ubud at Karsa Spa, also highly recommended.

The video clip, I’ve Been to Bali Too, came up on one of the Bali Facebook pages. It was filmed in 1984. For those who know Bali and have been there, will also see how much the island has changed in the intervening years. The amount of traffic must’ve increased by 100% in the thirty-three years since the clip was filmed. More and bigger bridges, hotels, tourists, shops – even massive tourist buses from Java trying to negotiate the narrow mountain roads.

 

I noticed many more dogs than last time I was there. Most Bali dogs are not really owned by anyone although I saw quite a few had collars on and looked well tended. There seems to be a considerable disconnect between dogs ‘owned’ by ex-pats in Bali and the local owners. We met an Australian tourist walking a large and beautiful black dog along the front in Sanur. I asked her about the dog. She told me it belonged to the homestay where she was living. She decided to walk it each day because it was cooped up most of the time. She said, “He pulls like crazy and smells like a polecat!” I had to agree, the dog really smelled to high heaven. I saw one dog covered in sarcoptic mange poor creature. Rabies is endemic in Bali, especially in the countryside.

The outbreak of measles in Bali concerns many people. Many Balinese suffer hearing loss because of measles. Not only deafness, but also blindness can result from measles. I can remember when I was a child, 20 years before measles vaccine was invented; we had to stay in a darkened room because of the threat measles posed to vision. I’m still amazed that some Australians do not vaccinate their children against this – and other ‘childhood’ diseases.

Everywhere you turn in Bali another hotel is under construction. Nearly 5million tourists visited Bali in 2016. And so the development in Bali continues with POTUS wanting to build a massive resort on the sacred ground of Tanalot. It saddens me.

 

Bali